The cause of Sinead O’Connor’s death was discovered months after her unexpected demise.

The findings of the autopsy conducted on Irish artist and activist Sinead O’Connor were made public by the London coroner’s office.

Months after the untimely death of the Irish musician Sinéad O’Connor at the age of 56, the cause of death has been disclosed by the coroner’s office in London.

London’s Southwark Coroner’s Court said in a brief statement on Tuesday that O’Connor passed away from natural causes, which indicates that she was not the victim of her own illness or that of another person. The coroner declared that “no further comments will be made” regarding the matter and that this finding ends the office’s involvement in her death.

On July 26, 2023, O’Connor was discovered unconscious at a residence in South London. The coroner’s office declared that an autopsy would be performed as there was no apparent medical reason for O’Connor’s death.

Following her departure, the songwriter’s family released a statement in which they said, “We regret to inform you of the passing of our dear Sinéad. During this extremely trying time, her friends and family have asked for privacy as they are saddened.”

O’Connor was born in Dublin, and her 1987 debut album “The Lion and the Cobra”—which featured the now-famous buzzcut—launched her into prominence. Nevertheless, it was her cover of Prince’s “Nothing Compares 2 U,” which went on to become a global smash, that launched her career in 1990 with the release of her album “I Do Not Want What I Haven’t Got.”

O’Connor put issued ten studio albums between 1987 and 2014, but in between and beyond of it all, she gained notoriety for her vocals and her advocacy of global issues and social causes.

Record executives pressured the singer to look more “feminine” by industry standards, thus her decision to shave her head was a sort of disobedience in and of itself.

She was criticized by some well-known celebrities as well as the general public in 1990 for refusing to perform if the American national anthem was played prior to one of her concerts. The following year, she criticized the American music industry for prioritizing monetary success over creative merit and declined to receive her Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Performance.

O’Connor caused more controversy in 1992 when, while protesting sexual abuse in the Catholic Church, she famously tore up a picture of Pope John Paul II on “Saturday Night Live” and advised viewers to “fight the real enemy.” She later stated that she didn’t regret the incident in her memoir “Rememberings” from 2021, claiming that it “re-railed” rather than “derailed,” as many had feared, her career as a “protest singer.”

Over the years, O’Connor has been transparent about her battles with mental health, especially after her son Shane, 17, committed himself 18 months before to her own death. O’Connor checked herself into a hospital following a string of alarming tweets on the platform at the time.

Following O’Connor’s passing, a plethora of celebrity social media posts and performances were made in her honor, and thousands of admirers flocked to the streets to grieve during her funeral procession in August.

A memorial concert for O’Connor and The Pogues’ lead vocalist Shane MacGowan, who also passed away in 2023, was announced on the same day as her cause of death. It will happen on March 20 at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

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Original Publish 1/10/2024

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